3.1

A player returns a qualifying score from a round played under the jurisdiction of another national association (which is not the player’s handicapping authority). How should this score be applied for handicapping purposes?
The player has to provide his home club with the following information:

  • evidence that it was a qualifying score (e.g., a copy of conditions of competition or a list of official scores);
  • name of the club at which the round was played, and information about the national association for that club;
  • a score card with the hole-by-hole scores;
  • Par and handicap stroke index of each hole played;
  • USGA Course Rating and Slope Rating values of the course (tees) played (the latter is essential
    for handicap review);
  • EGA Playing Handicap Differential for players in handicap category 6 (in EGA countries);
  • CBA (or equivalent) of the competition round, if applicable.

This information enables the player’s handicap committee to establish the correct playing handicap and to use the away score for handicapping purposes by converting the score into Stableford points according to EGA Handicap System requirements. If applicable, the CBA calculation must be applied before any handicap adjustment.

3.2

A player returns a qualifying score from a round played under the jurisdiction of another national association which has not adopted the EGA Handicap System. How should this score be applied for handicapping purposes?
In addition to the information required as defined in 3.1 above, the following will need to be taken into account:

CONGU:

When no Course Rating is available use SSS (Standard Scratch Score); when no Slope Rating is available use 124.
The playing handicap calculation (see Clause 3.9) will be adjusted accordingly and scores returned from rounds played under the jurisdiction of CONGU are then converted into Stableford points according to the requirements of the EGA Handicap System.
The difference “SSS – CSS” must be applied to the players’ Stableford score as the CBA adjustment, if applicable.

Example 1:

IF COURSE RATING AND SLOPE RATING ARE AVAILABLE

A player with an EGA Handicap of 3.5 plays a competition run by a club under the jurisdiction of CONGU. The course has a SSS of 73, a Course Rating of 72.6, a Slope Rating of 137 and the Par is 71. The CSS was 74.
The EGA Playing Handicap (PH) is calculated as follows:

The Stableford points are calculated using the EGA Playing Handicap:

The CBA is calculated using the formula:

CBA = SSSCSS = 73 − 74 = −1

The player’s EGA Handicap is not modified as his score is inside the adjusted buffer zone 34-35 (CBA -1).

Example 2:

IF ONLY STANDARD SCRATCH SCORE IS AVAILABLE

A player with an EGA Handicap of 3.5 plays a competition run by a club under the jurisdiction of CONGU. The course has a SSS 73 and the Par is 71. The CSS was 74.

The EGA Playing Handicap (PH) is calculated as follows:

The Stableford points are calculated using the EGA Playing Handicap:

The CBA is calculated using the formula:
CBA = SSSCSS = 73 − 74 = −1

The player’s EGA Handicap is not modified as his score is inside the adjusted buffer zone 34-35 (CBA -1).

USGA:

The playing handicap will be calculated (see Clause 3.9) and scores returned from rounds played under the jurisdiction of the USGA are converted into Stableford points according to the requirements of the EGA Handicap System. If no adjustment for playing conditions exists, apply CBA = 0.

Example:

A player with an EGA Handicap of 3.5 plays a competition run by a club under the jurisdiction of
USGA. The course has a Course Rating of 72.6, a Slope Rating of 137 and the Par is 71.

The EGA Playing Handicap (PH) is calculated as follows:

The Stableford points are calculated using the EGA Playing Handicap:

The player’s EGA Handicap is increased by 0.1 as his score is outside the buffer zone (35-36).

Other countries

Countries using handicapping systems other than CONGU and USGA which use the USGA Course Rating System: see USGA.
Scores from rounds played in other countries are not acceptable for handicapping purposes.

3.3

How will a score returned in a competition where handicap limits apply, but where the player’s handicap exceeds the limit, be treated for handicapping purposes?
The score is a qualifying score provided the handicap conditions are satisfied. The competition result is calculated using the EGA Handicap limits imposed by the conditions of competition. However, for handicapping purposes, the handicap committee must calculate the Stableford score for each player using the playing handicap based on the EGA Handicap.

Example:

A player with an EGA Handicap of 28.2 plays a competition where the EGA Handicap limit is 24.0. The
course has a Course Rating of 71.2, a Slope Rating of 129 and the Par is 72.

The EGA Playing Handicap (PH) for the competition is calculated as follows:

The EGA Playing Handicap (PH) for handicapping is calculated as follows:

3.4

How should scores returned in stroke play competitions where handicaps do not apply be used for handicapping purposes?
Even if handicaps do not apply for the competition results, the scores played in such rounds are qualifying scores provided the handicap conditions are satisfied. The handicap committee must calculate the Stableford score for each player using the playing handicap based on the EGA handicap.

3.5

May an EDS 9-hole score, returned when 18 holes have been played, be accepted for handicapping purposes?
Yes, provided that the player had previously registered the 9-hole EDS as required. The provision that a 9-hole score may not be part of an 18-hole score is intended to prevent the player from choosing the better of the two 9-hole scores. This decision may appear to be against the spirit and intent of allowing 9-hole scores, but it would not be appropriate or practicable to interfere with the way players plan to spend their time.

3.6

What is the status of a player’s score when the Committee allowed him to play in a competition for which he did not satisfy the entry requirements?
If a player returns a score after playing in a competition which he was allowed to enter by the Committee even though he did not meet the eligibility provisions, the score is a qualifying score.

3.7

How should scores returned in a “Maximum Score” stroke play competitions be considered for handicapping purposes?
Maximum Score is a form of stroke play; these rounds are qualifying competitions provided all other handicap conditions prevail. The maximum hole score should not be set lower than net double bogey.

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